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Gmail Send As GoDaddy Email Forwarding

Using Gmail’s send mail as function with a GoDaddy email forwarder address is easier than you think. It seems like GMail doesn’t want us to do this, because they don’t offer any instructions on how to set it up.

In fact, a lot of the material I read while researching this topic says that Google recently changed their “treat as alias” settings to require additional authentication. That’s a perfectly fine idea, but I wish they were clearer about how to integrate it with other services like, oh ya know, one of the largest hosting companies on the planet.

Quick note: if you’re looking for more hacks and tips like this one, please check out my company’s website: Mxt Media – Central MA SEO. I’d appreciate it!

Anyway, here’s the Gmail send as GoDaddy email forwarding magic spell.

1. Create an application-specific password (“App password”)

We’ll need this later, so it’s best to get it out of the way early. Here’s Google’s documentation about App passwords. The process is pretty simple, but it does require enabling 2-step verification. No help on that one. Just do it. Once 2-step is turned on, come back here and we can start back on the App Password thing.

Gmail GoDaddy email forward (11): My account.

1A. Go to your Google Account

Click on your face.

Gmail GoDaddy email forward (12): Sign-in & security.

1B. Go to Sign-in & security

Click on the thing that doesn’t really look like a link.

Gmail GoDaddy email forward (13): Security settings.

1C. Go to App Passwords

Click on the other thing that doesn’t really look like a link.

Note: if you don’t see App Passwords as an option, you probably haven’t turned on 2-step verification yet. You must do that first.

Gmail GoDaddy email forward (6): App Passwords.

1D. Your App Passwords

This is a list of all the application-specific passwords you’ve ever created. Scroll to the bottom.

Gmail GoDaddy email forward (6): Select App.

1E. Add new App Password

These passwords are intended to be used only once. Google makes you choose when/where it will be used. Expand the Select app option.

Gmail GoDaddy email forward (8): Select App - Other.

1F. Select “Other (Custom name)”

You could probably choose Mail here, but to be extra clear, we’re going to provide our own name. Choose Other.

Gmail GoDaddy email forward (9): Generate password.

1G. Provide a name & hit Generate button

Type in some descriptive name, so you’ll recognize what this password is for the next time you visit the App Passwords list. Then hit the magic button.

Gmail GoDaddy email forward (10): Generated App password.

1H. Voilà

Copy the password in the yellow and SAVE IT. You’ll need it in the next step.

2. Add a “Send mail as” address

Find the Send Mail As option in Settings > Accounts and Import. Click to add a new address you own:

Gmail GoDaddy email forward (3): Add account you own.

The first step is easy and it hasn’t changed much since Google first rolled out this feature in….Bueller? I have no idea when. You can tell that by the 2007-era interface.

Fill in the name and send-as email, leave “Treat as an alias” checked, and click the Next Step button.

End of step.

3. Configure SMTP server

You don’t have to know what an SMTP server is. You just have to put this info in:

Gmail GoDaddy email forward (5): SMTP Server settings.

So, for example:

  • SMTP Server: smtp.gmail.com (no options here; type that in verbatim)
  • Username: jane.doe.example@gmail.com (this is your main GMail address, not  your send-as address)
  • Password: •••••••••••••••• (Paste in the App Password that we created in Step 1)

Note: if you get a DNS error, you probably forgot to change the SMTP Server field from smtp.EXAMPLE.com to smtp.gmail.com. If you get an authentication error, there’s something wrong with your App Password. Try that step again.

4. Party

Once you see this “confirm verification” message, you’re home free. The verification code was sent to your GoDaddy email forwarder. As long as that forwarder is set up properly, you can go grab that verification code and enter it here. Hit the Verify button and you’re done.

Gmail GoDaddy email forward (15): Verification code.

Credit where credit is due

I found the working answer thanks to this post by Ellis Benus. Without it, I’d still be scratching my head. Ellis linked to his tutorial on a Super User thread. If you’re interested, the thread provides a bit of background info, but it’s not necessary.

I originally tried the Brand Revive method, but hit a brick wall since their method does not appear to work for GoDaddy’s forwarded emails, only the “Professional Email” webmail inbox product, which is $4/mo. Who pays for email these days, especially if you’re using GMail to send and receive it?

162 thoughts on “Gmail Send As GoDaddy Email Forwarding

  1. Suzanne

    Ditto on the thanks. Any reason I can’t now turn off the 2 step verification? I live rural and cell phones don’t work out here.

    Reply
  2. Mirjana

    This is great! Thank you very much! I am so thrilled this works now! But now I have another question. Now that I can write from my GoDaddy Forwarding Email via Gmail, is there also a way to import that address to my mail system (Mail on Mac) so that I can also write through there with my forwarding address?

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly Post author

      @Mirjana: I’m sorry, I can’t help with that. I use GMail through their web interface, so I have no experience with the desktop clients.

  3. Messi

    Thanks a lot for the great help. I have spent hours trying to figure this out and I am sure I would still be scratching my head if it wasn’t for your post:-)

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly Post author

      Hi Phi, are you using iOS’ native Mail application or Google’s GMail app? You might have to use GMail, but I’m not 100% sure.

  4. Chaya

    Worked perfectly! been searching the web all day for this, I knew there had to be a solution, and this was it! Greatly appreciated!

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly Post author

      Thanks for your comment, Wanza. I’m not sure what you mean. The sending/receiving of the emails is handled by GMail’s system, regardless of which device you’re using to read them.

      Hypothetically, all the steps I described above are the same regardless of device too. I don’t think you can use GMail’s mobile app to change settings, though. I think that has to be done at gmail.com.

  5. Wanza

    What i mean was if i want to set up “my send-as email” in the phone i.e ios. Can i use the same steps above for that?

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly Post author

      In my experience, if you use the GMail iOS app, send-mail-as will work as expected. If you use iOS’ native Mail app, it will not.

  6. Catherine

    Thank you so much! I have been periodically trying to do this for about a year and a half, hoping that somehow whatever the problem was would get corrected in that time frame and it never did. I have one question: I have emails from my godaddy inbox getting forwarded to my gmail through the POP3 server. Now that the smtp server is set up, do I still need the POP3 checking my godaddy inbox?

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly Post author

      Thanks for reading, Catherine. Glad this helped you.

      No, you won’t need POP3 anymore. The combination of Forwarding and Send As that I’ve described here will cover everything for you. No POP necessary.

  7. XpressEpublishing

    Hi, Your guide was great help. I did what you said and it seems to work, but gmail doesn’t send my messages when i use the alias, it considers it spam. It sends fine when i use my normal email name. Is there anything i can do about it?

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly Post author

      Hi, thanks for your comment. I can’t answer your question. I don’t know anything about GMail’s spam filters. All I know is how to connect GoDaddy and Gmail! I’m sorry I can’t be of more help.

  8. Doug Daulton

    TJ – Great tutorial. I may have an edge case for you. I have 2-factor auth and app password set up as instructed. I go to add the alias and I am told that I must route through the alt domain (not gmail) and my account is not set up for that. And, contact my domain admin.

    I am on Google Apps for Business (GA4B) … not free gmail. I am my domain admin and I do not see where I fix this issue in the GA4B domain admin tools.

    Is this a result of being on GA4B? What am I missing? Example in screencast below.

    http://screencast.com/t/GIRcuHHeeViP

    Thanks,

    dd

    Reply
  9. TJ Kelly Post author

    Thanks for your comment, Doug.

    I have no experience with GA4B, so it’s entirely possible that it’s the culprit. If so, I may not be able to help.

    However, try unchecking the “Treat as alias” checkbox. Honestly, I doubt that will solve the problem, but it’s worth trying.

    That’s the best I can offer! Apologies that I don’t have a better answer for you.

    Please comment again and let us know if it works out, or if you find some other solution. Thanks again for your comment.

    Reply
  10. TJ Kelly Post author

    @Doug, thanks for posting the follow-up! Very handy, and hopefully it will save someone else the headache you endured! Cheers

    Reply
  11. Rick Berry

    TJ-I’m impressed with the clarity of your explanation, especially letting us know, if something doesn’t work, which step we screwed up earlier. Very helpful-thank you for sharing your expertise.

    Reply
  12. Keegan

    Thanks for you great tutorial, everything seemed to work fine until i really try to send email out via my alias. i get an error that reads
    “Technical details of permanent failure:
    Google tried to deliver your message, but it was rejected by the relay smtp.gmail.com [173.194.208.109].

    The error that the other server returned was:
    535-5.7.8 Username and Password not accepted. Learn more at
    535 5.7.8 https://support.google.com/mail/answer/14257 19sm1074292qhk.18 – gsmtp
    (SMTP AUTH failed with the remote server)”

    any help please

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly Post author

      Hi Keegan, thanks for your comment. It looks from that error message that you have an authentication problem: “35-5.7.8 Username and Password not accepted.

      Have you double-checked your app password and that you used the right username (gmail, not send-as) in Step 3?

    1. TJ Kelly Post author

      Great! Glad it worked out. Would you mind sharing what the problem was, in case someone else asks in the future?

  13. Gustavo

    It seems like google changed its Sign-in & Security settings. I couldn’t find a way to add an app. Have anyone managed to do this workaround recently? Thanks!

    Reply
  14. TJ Kelly Post author

    Hey Gustavo, thanks for commenting. Are you sure you have 2-step authentication enabled? I just took these screenshots of the App Passwords screens:

    http://www.tjkelly.com/wp-content/uploads/gmail-godaddy-email-forwarding-2016-app-passwords.jpg
    http://www.tjkelly.com/wp-content/uploads/gmail-godaddy-email-forwarding-2016-add-apps.jpg

    Based on that, it looks like the interface is still the same and generating a new app password still works as explained above.

    Can you elaborate any further on what you’re seeing and how it differs from the above?

    Reply
  15. Jim

    Whoops, didn’t read prior to the steps, “The process is pretty simple, but it does require enabling 2-step verification.” then the options were there…

    Seems to work, but instead of saying “Not an alias.”, it now says “Mail is sent through: smtp.gmail.com, Secured connection on port 587 using TLS”, will it work?

    Reply
  16. TJ Kelly Post author

    Hey Jim, thanks for your comments. Sadly, my answer is: I don’t know. I can’t replicate that message, so I can’t figure out how it relates to this workaround.

    Can you show us some screenshots or something to help explain HOW to arrived at that message?

    Reply
  17. Shelly

    THANK YOU — Have been trying to help some friends who just started a new recovery center in town and just have email forwarding at Godaddy — thought I was going crazy. This was VERY HELPFUL and I was able to solve the issue for them.

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly Post author

      Thank YOU, Shelly. This might be my favorite comment yet. Thanks so much for sharing. I’m glad I could help!

  18. Ramy

    Years ago GoDaddy forwarding addresses were somehow configured to an outbound server with a password. Back then, it was easy to configure the address as the “Send As” in gmail.
    It took me an entire day of tinkering to finally figure out that GoDaddy forwarding addresses no longer have outbound servers and passwords associated with them. GoDaddy changed their settings and thus its no longer possible use the GoDaddy server info when setting up your “Send As” address in gmail.
    Your work-around is brilliant. Thanks and God bless

    Reply
  19. indicasnow

    Oh man, this was AWESOME!!!! My only suggestion is that in Step 3 in the Send Mail through the SMTP server, I was setting up a .org website, and so this was originally smtp.mywebsitedomain.org. I replaced “mywebsitedomain” with “gmail” but it wouldn’t work. I finally realized that it should be smtp.gmail.com. Worked like a charm after that. So just a quick heads up for anyone else setting up a .org website.

    I feel like I need a drink after making it through that! LOL!

    Reply
  20. mkhennings

    FYI, after I set everything up I turned off the two step verification and it seems to be working just fine.

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly Post author

      Thanks Molly! Glad to know.

      I have to pipe up here, however, and say that 2-factor is totally worth it! SIGNIFICANTLY decreases the chances of your account getting hacked. Strongly recommended :)

    2. mkhennings

      TJ, I agree, but I was setting the alias up in my husbands e-mail…every time I log into his account I would have to wait for him to text me the verification code. I do have the setting for when any new log ins from an unknown device sends an alert to e-mail and backup e-mail as well as text to phone. The device has to be approved before that device can log in. When I set the two step verification up yesterday even though I clicked save this device it still needed the code to log in.
      Also, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR THESE DIRECTIONS!!! You’re a life saver!

  21. LK

    Hello TJ, Thank you for the great instructional, it worked exactly as you described. However, now my question is how to get the “Send As” alias email to show up on an Android phone GMail app or even in Gmail.com in order to initiate an email with that alias email address. The GMail address only shows as an option of selecting in the “from” area. Thank you again for your great instructions!

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly Post author

      Hi LK, thanks for your comment. I’m not sure I understand what you’re asking. The alias is supposed to show in the FROM field. Is that not what you expected?

  22. LK

    Yes, I want the alias to show in the FROM field. It does show up on my computer, as I set it up from your directions, however, it does not show up in the FROM field on my Android phone. Hope that I clarified better.

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly Post author

      Ah, understood. I can’t help you there. I’m an iPhone user. I do know that in the GMail iOS app, my aliases *do* show up as suggested FROM addresses. Maybe that means it will work on the Android app too?

  23. LK

    Had you gone through all the steps you describe above on your computer or on your iPhone only? Thank you again.

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly Post author

      Computer only. I never did anything special on my iPhone. It just worked there. I presume the GMail app accesses the “send as” aliases the same way the webapp does, thus the setup needed to be done only once.

    1. TJ Kelly Post author

      Thank you. I still can’t make this work. I get stuck at “Allow me to respond to event invitations forwarded from these addresses.” I don’t have that option and I can’t figure out why.

  24. Lisa Connolly

    OMG you are an absolute legend!!! I have spend hours on this, googled other blogs and tried all the suggestions and got no-where. I was about to spend money buying a professional gmail package to solve the issue…..and then I stumbled on your website. Thank you so much. I had it working in 2 minutes. Thank you, thank you, thank you! :)

    Reply
  25. Liz

    Liiiiiife saver!! And money too! Thank you for creating this entry and sharing! I will share your pages w/ friends and whoever for sure. Keep up the great writing, its very appreciated.

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly Post author

      A few days late on my response, Liz. Apologies. But THANK YOU! I’m glad you found it helpful. Please consider linking back to this post so others will find it too!

  26. S.dette

    THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!
    I tried about 10 other websites before stumbling upon your site!!
    Was almost about to spend $50 on getting a pro to do it.. you’re the best!!!

    Reply
  27. Jeff

    This is by far the simplest and most straightforward way to integrate gmail with the GoDaddy Forwarding email address! Thank you for posting these steps.

    If only we could get google (and all other search engines) to ignore all the bad and useless instructions out there.

    Reply
  28. mchampfl

    While I applaud the ingenuity of the efforts of you and others for the solution presented here, it seems to me that a different solution is more desirable because if the winds blowing through Google ever change, your App Password solution could become dead in the water without knowing it until the point, “Hey, how come I’m not getting any email?”

    I offer my solution (in summary) as an alternative: 1)turn on Allow Less Secure Apps in the Google Account. 2)point the GoDaddy forward to some alternate mailbox temporarily in order to access emails that are generated during the setup. 3)point the Gmail SMTP to its own smtp.gmail.com using the very same login you are trying to forward to. 4)complete the Verification Code. 5)Voila! now point the GoDaddy forward to the now setup Gmail account. Once Allow Less Secure Apps was turned on, the SMTP server setup proceeded to the Verification Code step without error.

    The genius of *your* solution is recognizing Gmail’s behavior in alternately accessing its own SMTP server as an outside app and treating it thusly. How much better it would be if Gmail would, during the process, pop up the standard Allow This App window that is used when any other app requests access. Further, Gmail’s loop around access to its own SMTP servers is considered A Less Secure App?!!! What is up with that?!!!

    Admittedly, I do not fully understand how the security issues of Allow Less Secure Apps weighs against what seems to me the “hack”-ness of your solution. Your use of what appears to me to be a One-Time-Password worries me that it may end up being treated by Gmail’s SMTP access as “one time” – especially if 2-Step Verification is turned off subsequent to the setup. I guess I’m saying that my lack of understanding of how this App Password is intended to work (as opposed to how it is being used here) is what bothers me.

    Another solution I found that also works is to just setup a dummy Yahoo email account (or use *any* email account you own other than Gmail) and set it for *that* SMTP server. I did not pursue this solution far enough to determine if Gmail actually *uses* that SMTP server to send the email, which may be evidenced by all outgoing mail being deposited in the dummy Yahoo Sent Folder. If it does, it could prove to be problematic for the email headers, spam filters, etc.

    Your solution here is the top result in Google Search. I would encourage you and your readers to refine these solutions in all their nuances so that your page becomes *THE* definitive goto for any and all much-needed solutions available for this issue.

    Keep up the good work!!!!

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly

      Thanks @mchampfl, this is a very thorough response. If I follow your suggestion correctly, it seems like a pretty solid method.

      Regarding the “dead in the water” point from your first paragraph, I agree. Google could shut this down at any point. It’s risky, but that’s the price of a “hack” (as you called it…rightly so).

      But tell me, isn’t your method vulnerable to the same change in winds? The threat here IMO is not 2-step verification. It’s Google allowing use of its SMTP servers. And IIUC, both our methods rely on that allowance. No?

      In any case, your idea is still a good one. Thanks again for sharing (and for alerting me via contact form that my comments weren’t working properly!).

    2. mchampfl

      Thanks for the thoughtful response, which further demonstrates the potential for this to be *THE* goto page for this issue.

      No, I’m sorry, I would disagree and maintain that 2-Step Verification’s App Password is the uncertainty here, not SMTP access. Consider how prevalent 3rd party access to SMTP is. All the major players allow for incorporating other mailboxes into their accounts so that you’ll stay on their screen instead of bouncing around your many mailboxes. Also, their are a myriad of value-add email services that need access to your mailbox. Further, email clients (Outlook, Thunderbird, etc. – even mobile clients) are technically 3rd party. Thus, I would contend that 3rd party SMTP access is here to stay – it is just too much a part of the industry.

      The App Password, though is fuzzy to me. I have done some research since last and have a great deal more insight, but still unanswered questions about the App Password. Here is what I have learned…

      BASIC AUTHENTICATION: Historically, the way you got access to SMTP (or POP, or IMAP) was username and password, and often that unencrypted, in the open. With so much proliferation of value-add apps, not just with email, but across the board (Dropbox, YouTube, etc.), Basic Authentication meant that you were giving the trusted 3rd party app your login credentials, typically in the open, for it to keep/store. The security of doing this began to be questioned, particularly in 2 specific ways: 1)is the trusted 3rd party app storing your credentials in a responsible way (eg, to protect from hacker break-in’s, etc.); and 2)Basic Authentication does not provide for restricting access to, in our case, only email. Give a 3rd party app access to your Gmail account using Basic Authentication and now it has access to *everything* – Google Drive, YouTube, etc., and even Account information (password, etc.). Though the 3rd party app may be trusted, if he’s hacked, then your entire Google account is globally compromised.

      OAUTH2: Enter OAuth. I’m sure that all of us have seen the authentication screens being presented to us when we give 3rd party apps access to our accounts. This screen is OAuth at work – a 3rd party vendor / protocol that facilitates 3rd party app login in a more secure fashion. One notable aspect is that the login presented during the process is customized to the particular account the 3rd party app is wanting access to. For example, if I want my 3rd party app to access my Gmail, I’ll see what looks like a genuine Google login. If I want the 3rd party app to access my Dropbox account, I will see what looks like an official Dropbox login screen. It looks that way because that is what it actually is. Let’s say I want the Android app EStrong’s File Explorer to access my Dropbox account. So, figuratively, I “make a phone call to” EStrong’s and they say “ok, well let me get Dropbox on the line with us so you can authenticate.” Once Dropbox joins the call, EStrong’s puts his “leg of the call” on hold so he can’t hear, I authenticate with Dropbox, and then EStrong’s comes back on the line and he and Dropbox will do some kind of a token exchange that Dropbox creates unique to EStrong’s. In addition, you’ll notice that when Gmail (switching to a better example now) presents it’s login screen, it will list areas that the 3rd party app is requesting access, and thus will be granted access to, if you continue. Consequently, the token given to the 3rd party app is not only a unique login for that app, but restricts what that app can see once inside the account. The token exchange business is still fuzzy to me. Like, why would it not work for a hacker to steal the token from the 3rd party just as he would any login and use it to hack my account? I dunno. BTW, you don’t always see the “3-way phone call”. Some clients, eg. Outlook, the iPhone email client, etc., do OAuth2 in the background.

      Google announced over 2 years ago a gradual transition to only OAuth2 access to email accounts (https://security.googleblog.com/2014/04/new-security-measures-will-affect-older.html). And apparently this concept is being adopted across the industry. Here’s Yahoo’s: https://help.yahoo.com/kb/SLN27791.html

      So the security option in our Google Account Settings called Allow Less Secure Apps means “turn off OAuth2 and go back to Basic Authentication – Globally!!!”. Ugh! This sure makes my method undesirable. But, I still am not comfortable about using App Password as an alternative. Here’s what I’ve learned about App Password…

      APP PASSWORD: This should be named “App-Specific Password”. And the definition of “App” as it is used here needs to be clearly understood. “App” does not refer to your 3rd party app, but instead refers to which “Google app” the password will grant access to. This means that the *same* password can be used across multiple 3rd party apps, though you have the option to generate a new one for each app and thus better securing 3rd party access.

      Question: in your images in your blog content, you show the pull-down selection for “Mail, Contacts, Calendar, & Other” when generating an App Password. I don’t want to take the time/bother with detailing all of this out and thus have not been to this screen. The question is, can you multi-select on this pull-down? That is, choose Mail *and* Contacts *and* Calendar? This is an important question because it will define Other. If you cannot multi-select, then Other likely means the combination of the three above it. If you *can* multi-select, then Other *may* mean “global access to the whole Google account”. I am inclined to think the former rather than the latter, because the Google announcement linked above discusses only email related access for OAuth2, though this cannot mean that OAuth2 is not being used elsewhere (Drive, YouTube, etc.) since we see the Authentication Screen presented by 3rd party apps when accessing those services. So, your recommendation for “Other” concerns me.

      Though it may actually be that using an App Password will work just fine in the way you suggest using it, clearly Google’s intent in offering the App Password is that 3rd party apps cannot do the second step in 2-Step Verification. Thus I hold to my position that your suggested solution of using App Password is a misuse of its intended purpose and thereby more so subject to the “changing winds within Google” – a “hack”. It is, at this point in our discovery, a *huge* unknown as to how Google will handle the App Password if 2-Step Verification is turned off after the SMTP access setup. This unknown causes me to lean towards Allow Less Secure Apps, because I do not want the hassle of leaving 2-Step Verification on. And beyond that, using your “hack” *requires* that, if a user leaves 2-Step Verification on, they must use an App Password for *every* future 3rd party access to Google services – whether the same one over and over, or generating a new one for each 3rd party app – even more hassle I don’t want to be burdened with. (BTW, this is a consequence that I think you should add to your solution description for the sake of your readers.)

      However, now that I better understand Allow Less Secure Apps, I have no choice but to concede to *your* conclusion that the risk of using a “hack” may be better than the security risk of globally taking all access into (presumably only, hopefully! only) email back to Basic Authentication. It is a tough decision that each user must weigh for himself. For me, not having a clear understanding of App Passwords after turning off 2-Step Verification, I choose Allow Less Secure Apps, because of the potential of 2-Step Verification being turned on hassling me in the future. Allow Less Secure Access is a set-it-once-and-forget-it. I choose laziness over security! (c:

      Assuming you would agree that what I have described here is valuable information, I would encourage you to incorporate it into your blog content up top. Google Search’ing this stuff is very convoluted and, additionally, I always find it a pain to wade through vast comments to find those golden nuggets that value-add to the author’s content. So, please, take this and word it as your own into your content so that readers are well educated as to the why’s and wherefore’s behind this issue. No attribution is necessary. We’re here for the community.

      Additionally, I would strongly encourage readers to chime in and contribute their knowledge and experience with these solutions.

      Additional links…
      – Allow less secure apps to access accounts: https://support.google.com/a/answer/6260879?hl=en
      – Sign in using App Passwords: https://support.google.com/mail/answer/185833?hl=en&visit_id=0-636124625166964709-2158794953&rd=1
      – What are the dangers of allowing “less secure apps” to access my Google account?: http://security.stackexchange.com/questions/66025/what-are-the-dangers-of-allowing-less-secure-apps-to-access-my-google-account
      – Google “Less Secure Apps” Explained: http://mbeiley.blogspot.com/2014/09/google-less-secure-apps-explained.html
      – OAuth: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OAuth
      – User Authentication with OAuth 2.0: https://oauth.net/articles/authentication/
      – Using OAuth 2.0 to Access Google APIs :https://developers.google.com/identity/protocols/OAuth2

    3. TJ Kelly

      I have to honest, you’ve crossed into territory on which I’m definitely not an expert. I found a method to accomplish my goal and I essentially stopped looking. You’ve clearly done your research on this, and I bow to your superior knowledge!

      I apologize, I have no qualified response. But I sincerely appreciate you taking the time to weigh in and respond in such detail.

    4. TJ Kelly

      I have to honest, you’ve crossed into territory on which I’m definitely not an expert. I found a method to accomplish my goal and I essentially stopped looking. You’ve clearly done your research on this, and I bow to your superior knowledge!

      I apologize, I have no qualified response. But I sincerely appreciate you taking the time to weigh in and respond in such detail.

    5. mchampfl

      And one more thing.

      I find it totally irresponsible on the part of Google to implement OAuth2 on their SMTP servers but *not* on their own email client! Especially when Yahoo and others are jumping on the bandwagon. This means if I wanted to integrate my Yahoo mailbox into my Gmail account, I have to go over to Yahoo and turn off OAuth2 on that account!

      If the SMTP Server Setup process in Gmail would present the OAuth2 screen when attempting to attach to a Google (or Yahoo, or whoever) SMTP server, the setup process would be so self-evident as to make this whole conversation moot – your blog post wouldn’t even exist.

      C’mon, Google!!!

  29. robogrl

    TJ, Sharing this process with all of us was a huge gift. Thank you!
    Following your instructions was easy and seemed to work great. But, now that I’m interacting with my GoDaddy email through Gmail, I’m having a small problem that I hope you might be able to help me fix. Here it is: after receiving a message into my gmail account (forwarded from Godaddy) I hit reply and Gmail populates the reply with the GoDaddy email address in the To: field instead of the sender’s email address. It happening like this on both accounts I set up using your instructions.

    Reply
    1. robogrl

      Almost! It follows your first three points, then…
      – As you were saying in bullet 3, I receive GoDaddy’s forwarded message in Gmail. It has “tj@tjkelly.com” in From and robo@grl.com in To. (robogrl@gmail.com is nowhere in To/From/CC/BCC/etc).
      – When I hit reply to that message, gmail defaults to robo@grl.com (the Godaddy forwarding address) into BOTH the To and From fields. (tj@tjkelly.com and robogrl@gmail.com are nowhere in To/From/CC/BCC/etc).

      Thanks for clarifying before advising! :)

    2. robogrl

      I’ve now followed your setup process from a different domain service, also using a forwarding address, and do not have the problem that I’m experiencing with GoDaddy (on multiple forwarding addresses). When I reply to the other domain host’s forwarded email, the original sender is properly in the To and original To address is properly in the From.

      I think next might try undoing the Gmail setups for GoDaddy forwarding addresses and redo them.

    3. Michelle

      This works great. Thanks! But, I’m having the same problem robogrl had. Did you ever figure out how to get the correct email address to populate when hitting reply? Mine shows my email address as the reply to address also.

    4. mky

      I wonder. That way your mail with From:robo@grl.com is being sent by smtp.google.com. Wouldn’t that trip spam protection rules? I think you will additionally need to setup an SPF record for domain grl.com to declare that smtp.google.com is allowed to send messages on your behalf.

    1. TJ Kelly

      Hi @ziwer1:disqus, thanks for your comment. Yes, I think you can. I have not tested it very much (because I prefer to leave 2VA on) but I believe it will work.

      Care to give it a shot and reply back here to tell us how it goes?

    2. francis zziwa

      Ok, I have turned it off and sending email with an alias still works. Thanks a lot for your hassle-free solution.

  30. Trevor Cherewka

    Hey TJ. Great post. A friend recommended it to me as I was pulling out my last hairs. I am trying to integrate Hotmail with Google (client not using HM but in case old emails out there, they can be captured with Gmail). Gmail keeps giving me the error for connecting and wants me to contact my “email provider” for help. I did two-step verification with HM but not having luck. Any help would be appreciated and would leave some hair on my head. :-)

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly

      Good question, @trevorcherewka:disqus . Wish I had an answer. I haven’t used Hotmail in ~15 years. I have no idea what their systems can handle or allow. It’s possible they block all access via third parties (or GMail specifically, more likely). But again: pure speculation. I can’t say with any confidence. Sorry I’m not more helpful!

  31. LK

    “TJ, this is a great resolution, thank you! Have you ever investigated a method of getting an “email read receipt” through
    GMail other than through a paid for G Suite? I considered forwarding emails to Microsoft Outlook but would enabling IMAP change the “GoDaddy email forwarding, send as” you have worked out?

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly

      These are great questions, @disqus_T4Q4JJzPfU:disqus. But sadly I can’t answer any of them. I don’t use any of the things you’ve listed: paid Google Apps, Outlook, nor read receipts.

      If you end up trying, would you mind commenting here again to tell us how it goes?

    1. TJ Kelly

      Thanks for your comment, Anna. In the example described above, you’d have to add your *gmail* email address to Mail.app. Then any emails sent to the GoDaddy address would be forwarded to your gmail account, which would in turn be displayed in Mail.app.

      As for how to add Gmail to Mail.app, I have no advice there. I don’t use Mail.app. I also don’t know if the reply-as/send-from would work in Mail.app, but I think so.

  32. Joe Blow

    THANK YOU SOOOOO MUCH!!!
    I’ve done dozens of these forwarded E-mail response set-ups for clients over the years and recently needed to do another one. However, as you pointed out, Google changed the procedure and this was the ONLY search that turned up with a working solution.

    If anyone cares, I have many E-mails from Maddog domains that forward to my Gmail account. When the domain is no longer valid, obviously I can’t receive E-mails sent to the forwarded address, but I can still reply from them. Seems like that could be a security issue, but I suppose there are easier ways to send an E-mail that looks like it came from somewhere else.

    Reply
  33. Monica Topete

    I tried to do this but got stuck on step 1. When I logged into my gmail account and tried to click on App passwords, I received the following error message: The setting you are looking for is not available for your account. I am on a Chromebook. Does this have to be done in another OS or from a mobile device?

    Reply
    1. Monica Topete

      THANK YOU. This worked!!! So glad I don’t have to buy an email yet another email account. It all adds up, lol! Genius!!!

  34. Bob Bucy

    I use mydomain.com but same principal applies. I had also been trying to get this to work for a while on Gmail, as it is very easy on Yahoo. These steps did the trick. Thank you for the help.

    Reply
  35. Juncal Garayzabal

    Thanks so much TJKelly! Such a helpful article.
    I’ve managed to get to the last step, and saw the “Confirm verification” email, but I don’t receive the email. Emails sent to my send-as address (GoDaddy) do reach my company’s gmail (which is the forwarding address in GoDaddy), but I don’t receive the confirmation email. Do you have any idea why this could be?
    Thanks again!

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly

      So you’ve never actually verified ownership of the forward-to address, but emails are being delivered there? What do you see in your Gmail Settings panel under Accounts and Forwarding? Does it look like the forwarding is setup properly and completely?

    2. Juncal Garayzabal

      Yes. I set up my Gmail account s the “forward to” address from GoDaddy, and it works.
      I was trying to change my send-as address to make it look more professional, and everything worked except the verification. When I check my Accounts and Forwarding, my GoDaddy account appears, but it says “verify”.
      I try to resend the verification e-mail, and it won’t work. However, if I send emails to my .org domain, I will receive them in my Gmail account.

    3. TJ Kelly

      Got it. Sounds like you may have an error in Step 3. If not, you could try undoing the forward temporarily. Let the verification email go to your actual GoDaddy inbox. Receive it there and verify in GMail normally. Then, when verification is complete, re-enable the forwarding.

    4. Juncal Garayzabal

      Thanks! I’ll try going through all the steps again first, and see what happens…

  36. Christa Swartz

    HELP! I did what you said (and helped 2 others do it). It worked beautifully, so thank you!! However, now our gmail will not sync with our android phones. Do you know of a solution? We are pulling our hair out. :) …almost.

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly

      I’m not an Adroid user, but Google tends to play nicer with Androids than iPhones, so I don’t see any problems off the bat with that setup.

      Looking deeper, can you tell me more about the setup? You’re forwarding from a GoDaddy yourdomain.com email to a GMail inbox per the setup described above, right?

      So presumably there are other straight-to-gmail messages that are coming into the same @gmail.com inbox? Are those still functioning properly on desktop? I.e. this forwarding hasn’t interrupted any standard gmail delivery, right?

      And what about those standard straight-to-gmail deliveries on Android? Are THEY coming into the Android?

      Lastly—not being an Android user—what email app are you using on the Androids? Does it have to be GMail, or are there others?

    2. Christa Swartz

      Thanks for the reply.
      1. To you first question, YES! exactly as described above.

      2. and YES! on the desktop version of gmail, all is well and works as normal receiving both direct to gmail and godaddy emails.

      3. NO emails are coming into the android phones no (direct to gmail address or godaddy)

      4. To your last question, There is the Gmail app and the mailbox app on the android. Both should be receiving as normally as they were before. BOTH are no longer receiving any gmail or godaddy emails. (These apps have not been touched, and do continue to receive email from other email sources that are synced.)

    3. TJ Kelly

      Gah. Tough one. Best I can say is revert and see if the problem fixes itself. If so, you’ve got a new problem to start googling!

      I’m sorry, I wish I had a better answer. SMTP and the like are not my strength, despite this article!

  37. tenprofessionals

    Hey brother, A huge thank you for this! A quick question too if I may… I have setup a huge number of accounts using this method(Thank you again) to the point I no longer need this site to follow the directions. That said, I have had no problems using this on a desktop or iPhone and today I ran across an android user who is sending me emails and is still shows from the original gmail account. Would you have any suggestions? He says he cannot logout of his gmail and that he would have to delete the account and re-add it. I told him to do it(can’t hurt) Waiting to hear back. In the mean time… Anything you can suggest would be greatly appreciated.

    Robert

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly

      @tenprofessionals:disqus Thanks for your comment, Robert. Glad this tutorial has helped you.

      Regarding the Android phones, I’m afraid I can’t be of service. I’m an iPhone user and—despite this article—I’m not really that knowledgeable about SMTP and email routing.

      @CSwartz777:disqus ran into a similar problem (you can see her comment thread above). Christa—any insight for Robert here?

  38. Micah

    I spent hours pulling my hair out on this. Even GoDaddy chat couldn’t help me. Thank you, thank you, thank you!!! Worked perfectly the first time.

    Reply
    1. TJ Kelly

      Yes there is, *IF* you have 2-step verification turned on. And the rest of the method definitely does still work. I’m still sending email this way every day, *AND* I just set up 3 new ones last week with this method.

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